Ngwayir (Western ringtail possum) in Dawesville

My family and our close friends with their kids spent Easter in Mandurah in a lovely house by the ocean.  Its now something of a family tradition and in previous years we have headed out wildlife watching without kids.  This year they are that little bit older and my son often asks to go possum hunting – so instead of exploring somewhere new we took the kids to where we went last year in Dawesville and found many Western ringtail possum (Pseudocheirus occidentalis) also called by the indigenous name Ngwayir.

Ngwayir are critically endangered on the IUCN red list and one of the main threatening processes is habitat loss due to clearing.  They also can be predated on the ground by feral animals especially as many trees have gone and they typically don’t travel on the ground.  They are only found in the South-West corner of WA and often found in conjunction with Peppermint trees (Agonis flexuosa).

The population in Dawesville is one of the most Northerly that I am aware of and I understand they came from population expansions after reintroductions into the Yalgorup National Park.  Due to their threatened status I won’t say exactly where they can be found but please contact me if you would like location information.

We rounded the 3 boys up and got them all kitted out with lights.  We had quite a few “are we there yet” on the 30 min trip but they were excited as well!  We headed up the road where there are many overhanging peppermints – initially we didn’t see any and I had the thought – have they all gone!

But then I caught some eyeshine!  It was too far off in private property, but I soon saw another – which was a Ngwayir.

Western ringtail possum @ Dawesville

We saw quite a few more and saw this Common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) or Koomal.  It was on the ground but shot up a tree when my 4yr old son ran to it!

Common brushtail possum @ Dawesville

We saw these 3 ringtails that were quite low on a very thin tree and the kids got a very good viewing.  When they thought we were too close they showed amazing climbing skills grabbing onto the overhanging peppermint foliage and just scaling up.

We had a great night.  We also tried my bat detector but there were none around.  All up we think we saw approx 20 ringtails and 2 brushtails.

Possum hunters! @ Dawesville

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Frogs & Wallabies…

My friend Andrew and I had been planning for a while to spotlight at one of the lakes near his house in Ballajura. Emu Lake is natural but surrounded by quite a lot of housing.  Our primary target was frogs.

We quickly found the first of many motorbike frogs (Litoria moorei) for the night which all seemed quite small and just chilling out in vegetation around the lake.  They were easily found from their eye shine in the beam of the head torch.

We found many and I added a few photos so you can see the variability of their colouration.

Just as we had nearly finished circumnavigating the lake we found these Moaning frogs (Heleioporus eyrei) just sitting on sandy patches amongst the grass, up from the lake.

The motorbike and moaning frogs were not calling but I did hear some Slender tree frogs (Litoria adelaidensis) calling in distant reeds – none were actually seen.

We then headed for Mirrabooka Bushland as I had read there had been Western brush wallaby (Macropus irma) found in a pretty urban location in the last couple of years.  Recording had been made of Parks & Wildlife’s NatureMap – so it was likely to be accurate and not a mix up with a normal common Western grey kangaroo.  The bushland is 85ha of mostly Banksia and pretty sandy tracks.  It is just next to Reid Hwy and can be accessed on the Western side of Northwood Dr, Mirrabooka.

The brush wallaby is proving to be a hard animal to photograph – I have seen them on perhaps 4-5 occasions but as soon as they see a person or the car stops they head for cover very quickly.

We walked a few trails not seeing any wildlife, only hearing at one point a single crash of something large which might have been a wallaby, but it didn’t keep going.

The only living animal was a Tawny frogmouth (Podargus strigoides) which I saw flying through my spotlight and then landed on a branch for a not so great photo.

Tawny frogmouth @ Mirrabooka

I think I would like to try again in the bushland as its a very urban location and would be amazing to find a wallaby in such a location.